A Festival of Landmark

History: People and Places Tent

Videos

Podcasts


  • The Last Duel in Scotland

    Alexander Boswell

    The story unfolds in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Fife. Two newly donated portraits prompt the telling of the tragic death in a duel of Alexander Boswell, son of the celebrated 18th-century diarist James Boswell of Auchinleck House.

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  • Woven Histories (parts 1-3)

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    The textile industries are of particular importance to the social, political and financial history of the country and via our Landmarks it is possible to trace this history and tell the story of both the trades and crafts associated with it.

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  • Woven Now: Sunny Bank Mill

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    Sunny Bank Mills in Farsley (near Calverley Old Hall), keeps a nationally important archive of weaving machinery, fabrics and documents. Meet Curator Rachel Moaby and weaver Agnis Smallwood and discover more about how traditions are being kept alive.

    You can read the transcript here

     Listen on Spotify
    Listen on iTunes
    Download an mp3
    To download, select the download an mp3 button above and then click the three dots to the right-hand side of the player.

About the portraits of Sir Alexander Boswell and his wife Grace

Sir Alexander Boswell of Auchinleck House (1775-1822) was the eldest son of the celebrated diarist and writer, James Boswell. Alexander’s father, Lord Auchinleck, was an Edinburgh judge and the builder of Auchinleck House.

Able to live comfortably as a country gentleman with the income from the Auchinleck estate, Alexander was known as a witty poet, songster, antiquary and bibliophile. He served as Tory MP for the rotten seat of Plympton Eale in Devon from 1816 to 1821, when he received his baronetcy. Soon after this, suspicion of his involvement in scurrilous anonymous attacks in the Tory press led to a dispute with James Stuart of Dunearn, who challenged him to a duel. Against all expectations, Sir Alexander received a fatal wound and died the following day.