Llwyn Celyn through the ages

End of the 11th century

Llanthony Valley?

1399-1415

Revolt of Owain Glyndwr against the Kingdom of England. The Llanthony Valley is briefly under Welsh rule.

1420-1

The main house at Llwyn Celyn is built. Very few vernacular Welsh houses like Llwyn Celyn survive from this period.

1538

The Llanthony Priory is supressed under Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monastries.

1546

The Llanthony Estate is acquired by Nicholas Arnold.

1620

Llwyn Celyn is assigned to William George, Gent.

1656

Llwyn Celyn assigned to William Watkin upon the death of William George.

1690s

A major remodelling of Llwyn Celyn takes place - the hall is ceiled, a kitchen is built and a chimney is inserted.

1717

William and Thomas Watkins, along with Thomas's son Job, are all said to be "of Llwyn Celyn." Thomas holds Llwyn Celyn, which is now around 150 acres.

1726

The Llanthony Estate is sold to the Harley family, Earls of Oxford.

1733

Thomas Watkins dies. Llwyn Celyn is assigned to his son Job. Several years later, Llwyn Celyn is assigned to Job's son, James.

1762

James Watkins surrenders Llwyn Celyn to Lord Edward Harley for payment of £20 because of debt.

1775

LLlwyn Celyn is leased to William Price for £50 pa.

1799

The Llanthony Estate is bought by Sir Mark Wood. Llwyn Celyn is now a farm of 148 acres and rented for £70 to Thomas Williams.

1807/8

The Llanthony Estate is sold by Sir Mark Wood to poet and writer Walter Savage Landor.

1811

The Llanvihangel Railway Co. is incorporated by Act of Parliament. The Nantyglo - Abergavenny tramway opens ten years later, with a junction at Llanvihangel.

1820s

LWilliam and Mary Morgan are recorded to have lived at Llwyn Celyn with four children born throughout the 1820s.

1841

Benjamin Davies (35), his wife Mary (32) and their four children Thomas (9), Jane (7), Mary Ann (5) and Bridget (3) are recorded to have lived at Llwyn Celyn.

1851

Thomas Griffiths (58) is recorded as farming 140 acres at Llwyn Celyn, living with his mother Mary (83), his wife Blanche (59) and their four children William (21), Thomas (19), Charlotte (16) and Mary (14). Michael Jasper takes on tenancy soon after.

1853

The Hereford, Monmouth and Newport railway line opens. Llanvihangel and Pandy both have stations.

1871

Michael Jasper lives at Llwyn Celyn with his wife Ann, their sons William and Jon, their young daughter and a female servant. 

1881

Michael and William Jasper (both widowers) live at Llwyn Celyn along with William's four children: Mary (11), James (8), Sarah Ann (6) and Margaret (4). Also living at Llwyn Celyn are housekeeper Elizabeth Parry (45), servant Mary Walker (15) and servant/labourer Arthur Rew (17).

1882

William Jasper marries Elizabeth Jones and have 7 children together.

1923

William Jasper dies. The tenancy remains in the Jasper family - Jack (John Warren) Jasper possibly takes over.

1947

Jack (John) Jasper relinquishes tenancy at Llwyn Celyn. It is taken over by his brother-in-law Tom Powell.

1951

The Ministry of Works takes charge of the Llanthony Priory site.

1958

Tenants Tom and Olive Powell buy Llwyn Celyn from the Landor Estate.

1990

Trefor and Lyndon Powell inherit Llwyn Celyn upon the death of their father Tom.

2014

Llwyn Celyn is bought by the Landmark Trust. The purchase if 100% funded by Cadw and the National Heritage Memorial Fund. HRH The Prince of Wales tours the site in July and meets Trefor and Lyndon.

2016

Following a succesful fundraising campaign, the Landmark Trust begin their restoration of Llwyn Celyn.

2018

The restoration of Llwyn Celyn is complete.